How Good Are We At Predicting The Best Fantasy Football Running Backs

One of fantasy football’s most basic aphorisms is that running backs are the best assets to collect — particularly the workhorse variety that rack up copious touches on the ground or through the air. According to a value-based drafting model, which measures a player’s scoring relative to the scarcity of production at his position, the most valuable player in fantasy has been a running back in 17 of the past 20 years. And when an owner hits on the stud running back du jour, it can go a long way toward helping win her league. But just how safe is it to bet on the preseason consensus top running backs with a high pick?To begin to answer the question, I gathered ESPN’s fantasy projection data going back to before the 2006 NFL season and noted the 12 running backs with the greatest expected fantasy points in the coming season. I then tracked how often those players ended up in a given RB tier at the end of the season. Here are the numbers over the past eight years:That’s a statement on the scarcity of sure-thing running backs, as well as the power of regression to the mean. The consensus top three running backs in a given year are usually safe bets to be viable fantasy starters (assuming a 12-team league with two starting RB slots), which is why there’s so much demand for them at the top of any fantasy draft. But in the tiers directly below them, running backs Nos. 4 through 9 are more likely to be among the bottom half of starters than the top half. The median running back ranked in slots 10 through 12 wasn’t a viable starter within the league structure described above.Then again, running backs are also the most consistent players in fantasy football. The truth is, all individual football statistics are relatively tough to predict because they depend on so much beyond the player himself, from teammates to coaches and everything in between.In light of that, it’s no wonder that many fantasy owners are too risk-averse. read more

Its All Good No Worries Between Steelers Antonio Brown

Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown confirms there’s no beef between him and offensive coordinator Todd Haley, after a confrontation on the football field.The incident happened during Steelers 20-10 loss to the Cincinnati Bengals.“We’re good,” Brown said Wednesday after practice to ESPN reporters. “We just talked about some things we could do better as a whole and what we could do to get on the right page to start winning.”The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported that Brown confronted Haley because he wanted more pass plays called for him.“It’s a little frustrating when you’re 0-2 and you want to contribute to your team and be a difference out there, but you’ve got to stay positive,” said Brown, who caught a team-high of six passes against the Bengals and was targeted nine times in the game. “There’s a lot more football to play, and you can’t hang your head yet.”Brown went on to say, “Would I like the ball more? Absolutely. But sometimes you’ve got to let the game come to you. I didn’t think it was a big issue. I guess that’s what happens when you lose.”In the video below, Watch Stephen A. Smith break down the troubles plaguing the Steelers so far this season. read more

DAngelo Russell Has Fueled The Nets Run

FiveThirtyEight’s current NBA predictions give the Brooklyn Nets an 81 percent chance of making the playoffs. That’s way better than the odds before the season began, when our predictions gave Brooklyn only a 34 percent chance of making it past the regular season. In the video above, Chris Herring takes a look at how the Nets got here and the challenges the team faces in maintaining this new success.

Carlsens Bizarre Decision Has Sent The World Chess Championship To Overtime

For hours, the play in Monday’s Game 12 of the World Chess Championship was filthy. Then it was weird. Things did not look drawish! But because of a remarkable decision by the world’s top grandmaster, they ended in a draw anyway.Over more than two weeks, more than 600 moves, 48 hours of play, one scandalous video and one black eye, the world’s top two grandmasters have now fought to a dozen straight draws. The World Chess Championship match between Norway’s Magnus Carlsen and the U.S.’s Fabiano Caruana remains deadlocked at the end of regulation, and the title will be now be decided by speedy tie-breaking games including, perhaps, a sudden-death format known as Armageddon.But before the tiebreakers came a wild, oscillating Game 12. Carlsen, with the black pieces, and Caruana, with the white, began with the Sveshnikov Sicilian, just as they had in Game 8 and Game 10. Carlsen was the first to deviate from the earlier contests, perhaps a stratagem to take Caruana out of his seemingly excellent preparation for the championship, and to angle for a decisive result at last. By the 12th move, the two were in uncharted territory, looking at a board that that no two people had created before at this level of chess.1This position did arise, however, in a game between the computer engines Stockfish and Houdini in this year’s Top Chess Engine Championship. (That game was a draw.) Blitz match 24.879.319.5 Armageddon 🔥0.080.419.6 read more

Wrestling Impact of Snyder Stieber nearly missing World Cup in Iran

Junior Kyle Snyder and former OSU wrestler Logan Steiber are honored at the Buckeyes Feb. 3, 2017 match against Penn State at the Schottenstein Center. OSU lost, 32-12. Credit: Nicholas McWilliams | Sports EditorThe travel ban placed on United States wrestlers, including Ohio State junior heavyweight Kyle Snyder and former OSU four-time national champion Logan Stieber, has been lifted, but a dangerous precedent might have been set.On Friday, the Iranian government announced the country would not be allowing American wrestlers to compete as a response to President Donald Trump’s executive order denying Iranian visas. However, a Sunday report by the semi-official news agency Fars, quoted Iran Foreign Ministry spokesman Bahram Ghasemi as saying the ban was lifted after a U.S. judge halted Trump’s executive order.The ban would have kept Snyder and Stieber out of the Freestyle World Cup in Kermanshah, Iran.On Friday, following a 32-12 dual meet loss to Penn State, Snyder and OSU coach Tom Ryan addressed the media about their general reactions to the initial order. While Ryan expressed his displeasure on the matter, he said having Snyder around for, potentially, the rest of the season is a big boost.“These guys have huge dreams, huge goals,” he said. “And I think that that event is a good event for them to get some experience that they need. And also, it’s a great event. It’s a dual meet event … USA against the world, with our best guys over there. So it’s a really good event. The flip side for us is, we want him over there, but when you don’t have that, you have him in our lineup.”Snyder, fresh off a gold medal victory at the Ivan Yarygin Grand Prix, will be competing in tournaments around the world during the four-year cycle between now and the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo. However, the ban would have effectively kept the Olympic gold medalist out of the World Cup.When he talked to the US Wrestling on Friday after the ban was announced, Snyder was told to sit tight and remain positive.“I heard about it (Friday morning),” Snyder said after the Penn State dual meet. “But, a couple of hours later I talked to US Wrestling, the people over there. And, they told me just to remain hopeful. The chances of us going are slim, but they said this could change any day.”Sure enough, the slim chance proved to be much greater than anticipated, and Snyder, along with wrestlers like Stieber and former Nebraska standout Jordan Burroughs, will be allowed to compete.Even though past bans have prevented athletes from certain nationalities from competing in tournaments in foreign countries, most recently from the Russian doping scandal, the Iranian ban is new territory. There were no positive drug tests or scandals.Instead, there was a decision made by one government that displeased another which directly impacted a world competition. In the future, barring any changes on the now stalled visa bans from Iran in the US, there might be little resistance in athletes from other nations traveling to other countries to compete in open tournaments. However, the impact on sports around the world could be catastrophic.Countries like Sudan and Syria are notorious for having athletes compete in US events like the Boston and New York Marathon. If the executive order is to be revived in any way, these events might take a severe hit in the number of participants.Returning marathon champion Mo Farah, who was born in Somalia, had some questions as to whether or not he would be allowed back into the country. However, it was later announced Farah could return.In the NBA, players like Thon Maker and Luol Deng, both of whom were born in Sudan, went through some nervous hours contemplating whether or not they would be allowed to travel with their respective teams. Although they were eventually cleared, questions remained on what would happen next.The ban has been controversial on both sides of the aisle, but if a ban on visas and travel from other countries is re-enacted, players and coaches from around the world who now live in the US might be out of a job and back to their native homes quickly. For now, the sports and collective world will wait and see what happens next, as travel from the seven affected countries continues. But, the wheels have been set in motion for what could be a bumpy road for athletes and potential citizens across the globe trying to make it in the United States. read more

Guiton steals spring spotlight

While most of the attention in Ohio State’s Spring Game was focused on Terrelle Pryor, another Buckeye quarterback was making a name for himself.Freshman Kenny Guiton quarterbacked the Gray squad Saturday, showing poise late in the game.Down 14-10 with time running out, Guiton orchestrated an 89-yard game-winning drive highlighted by a touchdown pass to receiver Taurian Washington.“I just had to go to my moneymaker [Washington],” Guiton said. “I thought if I tried him a couple times in the second half he’d come through again and he did.”The touchdown was the second of the day for Guiton and Washington after they also connected for a score in the first half.Guiton’s solid play was a product of his development this spring and he could be moving up the depth chart this fall. The Houston native outdueled backup Joe Bauserman and may become Pryor’s backup this season.Guiton was the second quarterback selected in the draft in the Spring Game, ahead of Bauserman, which he recognized as an honor.“I think it said a lot from the seniors,” Guiton said. “The seniors got to pick the draft. I feel like I’ve earned a lot of respect from the seniors and the offensive line.”Coach Jim Tressel was glad to see both Guiton and Bauserman getting experience throughout the game. “I thought they both got some very valuable reps under the gun,” Tressel said.Tressel also acknowledged he was excited to see the development of Guiton on display as he wasn’t sure how his depth was headed into this fall.“We really felt as we went into the last week of practice we weren’t sure if our depth had progressed as much as we’d like it to,” Tressel said.Guiton, like Pryor, is a dual-threat quarterback with potential that can continue to be developed. While he thought he played well, he noted there is always room for improvement, especially in his decision making.“To tell you the truth, you’re never satisfied,” Guiton said of his play. “But overall I think I had a pretty good day.”Guiton will have the opportunity to continue to develop and learn as he plays behind Pryor this year. And while he might not see much playing time this season, Tressel stressed that having Guiton add depth to the roster is critical.“You need to have a deep team to have a chance at the championship,” Tressel said. read more

BCS commissioners reach consensus propose 4team college football playoff

Bowl Championship Series commissioners have proposed a model four-team seeded playoff that will be presented to university presidents sometime next week for approval, according to the Associated Press. A consensus, according to the report, was reached Wednesday after commissioners spent four hours working to figure out how to structure the first playoff in college football history. Specifics concerning the actual playoff model, though, are limited, as the BCS commissioners were hesitant to share details before discussing them with university presidents, according to the report. Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott told the Associated Press “the two semifinals would be worked into the existing major bowls.” Ohio State’s department of athletics did not immediately respond The Lantern‘s request for comment from first-year coach Urban Meyer, who has said he is not in favor of abandoning the bowl system. At a press conference in the Woody Hayes Athletic Center on May 16, Meyer said the past decade’s setup has been “ideal” for college football. “I’ll probably get in trouble for saying this,” Meyer said. “I think the ideal setup is what’s happened in the last decade of football. I think we’ve had a true national champion.” Similarly, OSU President E. Gordon Gee said in a February interview with The Lantern that he was still against the notion of a playoff in college football, but lightened his stance on the matter. “I’m very much on record of being opposed to a playoff system,” Gee said. “Saying that, one of the things you have to do at my age, you have to understand that the world is changing around you, so therefore you have to take a look and see what the possibilities are … I want to think about it.” OSU representatives did not immediately respond to The Lantern‘s request for a comment. read more

Ohio State field hockey falls to balanced Louisville team

OSU junior back Emma Royce (27) fights for the ball during a game against Ball State on Sept. 14 at Buckeye Varsity Field. OSU won, 3-2, in overtime.Credit: Melissa Prax / Lantern photographerThe No. 16 Louisville Cardinals used a flurry of goals from six different players to defeat the Ohio State field hockey team, 6-3, Tuesday afternoon in Louisville, Ky.The Cardinals (7-1) took little to no time getting on the board when sophomore midfielder Lotta Kahlert scored unassisted just 2:20 into the game.The Buckeyes (3-5) countered less than through the opening half when freshman midfielder Morgan Kile hit senior midfielder Kaitlyn Wagner on a cross-field pass to tie the game at one.The draw did not last for long, however. Louisville pulled back in front less than four minutes later when sophomore forward Shannon Sloss connected off a rebounded save from OSU freshman goalie Liz Tamburro.Louisville extended its lead to 3-1 when senior forward Becca Maddock scored her seventh goal of the season off a pass from freshman forward Nicole Woods.OSU fought back to twice make it a one-goal game. Wagner scored her second goal of the game off a penalty corner before the end of the half to make it 3-2.With the score 4-2 early in the second half, junior forward Peanut Johnson dribbled right into the circle and shot past Louisville redshirt-junior goalkeeper Sydney King for her fourth goal of the season.That was as close as OSU would get. Louisville extended its lead to 5-3, and then, with 13 seconds left to play, senior back Mallory Mason converted on a penalty stroke to put a seal on the game.OSU freshman midfielder Maddy Humphrey, who was named Big Ten Freshman of the Week for the second time this season before the game, was held scoreless Tuesday after a weekend in which she tallied 11 points, including five goals and one assist. She assisted on Wagner’s second goal Tuesday against Louisville.The Virginia Beach, Va., native notched her first career hat trick Sunday against Appalachian State.The Buckeyes are set to host No. 10 Penn State at Buckeye Varsity Field on Sunday at 1 p.m. read more

NFL draft Curtis Samuel selected by the Carolina Panthers in the second

OSU junior H-back Curtis Samuel (4) scores the game-winning touchdown in the second overtime of the Buckeyes’ 30-27 win over Michigan on Nov. 26. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Photo EditorFormer Ohio State H-back Curtis Samuel has been selected with the 40th overall pick by the Carolina Panthers in the second round.He is the fourth Buckeye selected in the 2017 draft, following former teammates Marshon Lattimore, Malik Hooker and Gareon Conley. Samuel declared his intentions to forgo his final season of collegiate eligibility and enter the NFL draft on Jan. 9, becoming the third Buckeye at the time to announce his departure from OSU.In his final season with the Buckeyes, Samuel was recognized as a first-team All-American by both the Associated Press and Sporting News. He was also selected as a second-team All-American by Football Writers Association of America and Fox Sports. Serving as the hybrid back for OSU in 2016, Samuel seemed to do it all for the team. He led the Buckeyes with 865 receiving yards on 74 receptions, also tying the team-lead for touchdown receptions with seven. He also finished third on the team in rushing yards with 771 yards on 97 attempts, taking eight of those rushes for scores. Samuel was also the only player in Division I football to tally at least 600 receiving yards and 600 rushing yards.Samuel finished the season third in all-purpose yards in the Big Ten with 1,655 yards and tied for third in the conference with 15 total touchdowns. Most memorable of those touchdown came on Nov. 26 against Michigan when Samuel took a handoff left for a 15-yard game-winning touchdown in the Buckeyes’ 30-27 overtime victory.Entering the draft as a wide receiver, Samuel placed among the position’s leaders in several of the NFL Combine’s categories. He posted a 4.31 second 40-yard dash time, ranking second among all receivers, and finished eighth in the vertical jump with a 37-inch jump.Samuel is the second offensive player drafted by the Panthers in the 2017 draft. On Friday, the Carolina drafted former Stanford running back Christian McCaffrey with the No. 8 overall pick.Samuel joins former Buckeyes players safety Kurt Coleman and guard Andrew Norwell on the Panthers.The Panthers open the season in San Fransisco against the 49ers on September 10. read more

Poldarks popularity creates National Trust parking fee row after it charges tourists

first_imgThe Levant Mine where Poldark is filmed is charging people for parking after visitor numbers increased due to Poldark popularity. Until now parking at the coastal location has been free and residents are angry at the move.Ian Cooke created a Facebook group against the move by the National Trust.In an open letter he said: “Public feeling against this new policy is running very high locally and, to prevent a repeat of unsightly and costly vandalism, I once again appeal to the National Trust to reconsider their parking policy and agree to grant an exemption for this location.”We don’t want Levant Mine to be treated as a Poldark attraction.”The National Trust have still not taken on board public feelings about the new charges as applicable to Levant, but hope they eventually see sense and abandon this policy as it applies to the very special case of Levant due largely to the disaster of 1919 when 31 local miners were killed in a shaft less than 100 metres from the car park.” Poldark The parking meter is due to be replaced on Thursday and the National Trust says the fees raised will fund conservation and maintain the site.Ian Marsh, from the National Trust, said: “A terrible tragedy happened in 1919 where 31 men lost their lives there.”We know people still come to pay their respects, those that descend from the miners that lost their lives, and we don’t want to prevent that from happening in any way.”Those people are able to park for free and while they’re with us we want to hear their stories and hear their memories of the place.”center_img A Poldark film location, where 31 men died in a mining disaster, is at the centre of a row after its popularity led the National Trust to introduce parking charges.Anger over the ticket machine at Levant Mine in Cornwall even led vandals to pull it out of the ground.Scenes from the first series of Poldark were filmed at Levant Mine, and the National Trust said there had been a 50 per cent increase in visitor numbers to 100,000 people a year since the drama was first broadcast in March 2015.The site is the scene of the mining disaster where 31 people lost their lives in 1919. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Detective who questioned VIP witch hunt facing inquiry for banging desk

first_imgA senior detective who embarrassed his bosses over the child sex abuse ‘witch hunt’ of VIPs is being subjected to an internal police inquiry over claims he banged papers ‘too hard’ on a desk.Detective Chief Inspector Paul Settle has been accused of misconduct by a woman who falsely claimed she was raped by Lord Brittan, the former Conservative Home secretary, in the 1960s.The woman – who can be identified only as ‘Jane’ – lodged a formal complaint against DCI Settle eight months ago, The Telegraph can disclose.The detective, praised for his judgment in an independent inquiry into the VIP allegations, has been subjected to a series of complaints. Detective Chief Inspector Paul Settle has been accused of misconduct by a woman who falsely claimed she was raped by Lord Brittan, the former Conservative Home secretary, in the 1960s Lord and Lady BrittanCredit:Tim Rooke/REX Shutterstock She also alleges he disrespected her when he called her allegation “baseless” at a parliamentary hearing; and finally that he leaked details of her real identity and address to newspapers. The Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC), the police watchdog, has spent a year-and-a-half investigating two spurious allegations made against DCI Settle.The IPCC has now told DCI Settle that he has been cleared of any wrongdoing in the two cases it was looking at.But a third case – which can be reported for the first time – is being investigated internally by Scotland yard’s Directorate of Professional Standards.The complaint was brought by ‘Jane’ who claims that DCI Settle “banged” papers down on a desk when he first met her, which she claims was unprofessional. Lord Brittancenter_img Lord and Lady Brittan DCI Settle is understood to vehemently deny the allegations and is said to be deeply upset at the time being taken by Scotland yard to investigate.Jane had claimed she was raped by Lord Brittan at a flat in the 1967 but a police inquiry, led by DCI Settle, who was then head of the Met’s paedophile unit, found no evidence to corroborate the allegation and questioned many of the details.But under political pressure from Labour’s deputy leader Tom Watson, the investigation was re-opened. DCI Settle was taken off the case .Lord Brittan was cleared a second time but not told of the decision prior to his death in January 2015. ‘Jane’ then made her complaint against DCI Settle almost two years later in December 2016.Lord Brittan’s widow is deeply upset that DCI Settle is now being subjected to a complaint by the woman who falsely  accused her husband of rape, shredding his reputation in the months before his death from cancer at the age of 75. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. A source close to Lady Brittan said: “Paul Settle appears to be one of the very few people involved in this sorry affair who has conducted himself with honour, integrity and competence.“Yet he has been left in limbo by his employers and is now subject to seemingly malicious accusations and investigations from others. What a sorry state of affairs it is when the only police officer to have played a straight bat appears to be punished for doing so.”DCI Settle embarrassed the Met’s senior commanders when he gave evidence at a Home Affairs Select Committee in October 2015 that the decision to interview Lord Brittan over the rape allegation was a ‘baseless witch hunt’.His bosses had tried to prevent him from testifying to MPs.A friend of DCI Settle told The Telegraph: “He understands Jane’s complaint has to be investigated. But he cannot understand why it is taking so long. As with the two nonsense cases reported to the IPCC, he didn’t leak her details. “He just wants to get on with his life but this latest investigation is still hanging over his head. It is outrageous. It is a disgrace.”last_img read more

Scotland Yard raid sees corrupted children of the MDP gang responsible for

first_img“This gang have been running that line for quite a while and making a lot of money. These gangs have corrupted children and are using them to ferry drugs.”If you look across London, these are the kids that are getting involved in violence and stabbings because they are generally on the streets while the suppliers are removed from it, collecting the cash.” A group of Metropolitan Police officers enter a ground floor flat where a man was arrested Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick had been on patrol in Hackney, inner London, on Wednesday evening, where she said gang tensions were high after a spate of stabbings in recent weeks, including the killing of 18-year-old Israel Ogunsola. The huge @metpoliceuk operation last night targeted those involved in serious gangs and violent crime. Extra resources from City Hall are being used for more enforcement work from our police – who have my full support in this fight against violent crime across our city. pic.twitter.com/0r2UhFT7V2— Sadiq Khan (@SadiqKhan) April 12, 2018 A notorious London gang peddling crack cocaine and hoarding a sub-machine gun was raided by the Metropolitan Police last night in the latest crackdown on crime.The police commissioner described some of those involved as “corrupted children”, as police officers said the raid was directed at the MDP gang.MDP stands for “Murder Dem P——” and the group has been linked to several murders.Nine arrests were made, one of whom was a 14-year-old suspected drug runner, multiple firearms were seized and a large quantity of what is believed to be the Class A drugs crack cocaine and heroin was confiscated. Scotland Yard said that among the confiscated goods was a vast amount of cash, a Škorpion machine pistol, another handgun, 40 rounds of ammunition and a kilogram of suspected class A drugs.The co-ordinated raid on eight addresses in Northolt, Greenford, Fulham and Brentford comes as the Metropolitan Police has come under criticism for the spike in crime in London. The capital has accrued 55 open murder cases since the beginning of the year.  “In the last two weeks or so, and in particular since last weekend, we’ve been doing more and more. The Met is working very hard.”Sadiq Khan, the Mayor of London, said more raids were likely over the days and weeks ahead, commenting: “The huge Met operation last night targeted those involved in serious gangs and violent crime in London. It involved over 200 officers and resulted in nine arrests and the seizure of guns, ammunition and large quantities of what is believed to be Class A drugs. “Those committing violent crime, including criminal gangs, will be targeted. Extra resources from City Hall are being used for more enforcement work for our police.” A pair of Metropolitan Police officers secure a man in a Police van after he was arrested, during a raid in Northolt A group of Metropolitan Police officers leave a ground floor flat where a man was arrested,  He said that members of the gang took flashy holidays to Dubai, and had lavish collections of jewellery and watches as well as driving flashy cars and showing off their wealth online.One address in Earl’s Court had been “cuckooed”, which happens when criminals take over a vulnerable person’s or drug addict’s flat to sell drugs from it – named after the parasitic practice of the cuckoo bird which lays its eggs in other birds’ nests.Overall, six males and three females, aged between 14 and 49, were arrested in the early hours of Thursday and are now in custody. A group of Metropolitan Police officers enter a ground floor flat where a man was arrestedCredit: John Stillwell/PA Wire A man is led away by Metropolitan Police officers during a raid in NortholtCredit:John Stillwell/PA Wire Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Speaking to reporters shortly before the raids, she said the suspects had been causing “devastation” and “fear” in communities. 2 warrants executed in the early hours by TSG U53 on @MPSHammFul and @MPSKenChel. 1st address revealed 2 guns with ammo, 2kg Crack Cocaine and £50k. Male chased later on and arrested for this. 2nd address – 1 female arrested for supply of Class A Drugs. #ProtectingLondon pic.twitter.com/BIp3NmgRpR— MetTaskforce (@MetTaskforce) April 12, 2018 She said: “They are very violent, several of them have a history of serious violence, at least one is suspected of regularly using a firearm.”They will be arrested – not only have they been, as it appears to us, supplying crack cocaine and heroin, they’ve been making a huge amount of money.”They’ve been exploiting vulnerable people and very young people have been engaged in the drug-dealing operation. So they need to be locked up.”She added: “When I arrived just over a year ago we’ve been stepping up our anti-violence operations, we’ve been learning along the way. A group of Metropolitan Police officers leave a ground floor flat where a man was arrested, Credit:John Stillwell/PA Wire A pair of Metropolitan Police officers secure a man in a Police van after he was arrested, during a raid in NortholtCredit: John Stillwell/PA Wire Older members of the gang have been accused of using children to sell drugs as they reap the monetary benefits.DI Driss Hayoukane said: “This is a massive blow to an established gang. What we’ve taken out is probably a line which has been supplying the Earl’s Court and Fulham areas. A man is led away by Metropolitan Police officers during a raid in Northolt The raid has been named Operation Todhabi, and mainly targeted men in their late 20’s and 30’s who are suspected to be leading figures in the notorious gang.last_img read more

Dramatic bodyworn camera footage of moment armed suspected terrorist is taken down

Ali, a plumber from Edmonton, north London, denies two charges of possessing explosives with intent abroad in 2012 and one charge of preparing terrorist acts in Britain.The trial continues. The court has heard he planned an attack in the UK after spending five years making bombs with the Taliban in Afghanistan.He carried out “hostile reconnaissance” around Downing Street, New Scotland Yard, the Ministry of Defence, the MI6 building and the Cenotaph on March 18 and April 22 last year, the court has heard.The prosecution alleges Ali was targeting MPs, police and members of the armed forces. Khalid Ali smirking at police officers Having cut a backpack with a London logo and a Union Flag emblazoned upon it off his body with a pair of scissors, the officer finds a knife in each of his jacket pockets and one tucked into his waistband. Ali was then further arrested for having a bladed article and an officer told his colleagues: “Let’s make absolutely sure he has not got anything else before we put him in the car.” Dramatic body-worn camera footage has been aired in court of an armed suspected terrorist being taken down by armed police near Parliament.Khalid Ali, 28, was arrested at the Parliament Street junction on April 27 last year and the newly-released video shows the moment he is handcuffed by armed police officers and searched. Ali put his hands in the air and dropped to the pavement in Parliament Square having twice carried out ‘hostile reconnaissance’ around Downing Street, Parliament and the MI6 headquarters.In the police video, Ali was seen on the ground as he was arrested on suspicion of terrorism and when an officer asks him if he has anything on him that would cause harm, the defendant can be seen smirking and replying: “You’ll see.”Ali was seen to be bleeding from a cut on his hand as an officer wearing forensic gloves searched his pockets and clothes. Other officers seized the knives on the ground as Ali was led away in handcuffs. A police officer with his knee on Ali’s back, on which he is carrying a bag with a London logo and a Union Flag emblazoned upon it Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. A large knife is pulled from the waistband of Khalid Ali A knife stashed in Khalid Ali’s waistband While in custody, Ali’s clothes were taken away and he was found to have a small cut in the front of his underwear where the largest of the three knives was found, jurors heard.His DNA was on all three blades, said prosecutor Alison Morgan.Ali allegedly armed himself that day to deliver a “message” to British decision-makers, the court heard.  A police officer with his knee on Ali's back, on which he is carrying a bag with a London logo and a Union Flag emblazoned upon it A knife stashed in Khalid Ali's waistband Khalid Ali smirking at police officers A large knife is pulled from the waistband of Khalid Ali read more

Oxfam faces £16m in cuts after fallout from Haiti sex scandal

“Our other top priority for investment is our action plan to strengthen our continuing efforts to root out sexual harassment and abuse.”Oxfam GB is at the heart of the charity’s work, employing about 2,000 staff in the UK to support its international campaigns against poverty. “We are immensely grateful to all those – including more than nine in 10 of our regular givers – who have continued to support us during these difficult times. “This support makes a massive difference to people struggling to escape poverty and to survive disasters around the world.“We are cutting head office and support functions to ensure that we can continue with the majority of our lifesaving and life-changing work on the ground, such as helping Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh and people struggling to survive war in Yemen. Oxfam GB has been struggling to win back the confidence of the public, the UK government and its donors following allegations that members of its staff used sex workers during a relief mission after an earthquake hit Haiti in 2010.The charity stands accused of failing to disclose details of the alleged sexual misconduct by its staff to the Charity Commission, which has launched an inquiry.An Oxfam spokesman said: “We are devastated that the appalling behaviour of some former staff in Haiti, and shortcomings in how we dealt with that eight years ago, means we now have less money to provide clean water, food and other support to people who need it. Oxfam faces cutting back some of its overseas aid programmes after warning staff it needs to find £16 million of savings due to the fallout from the Haiti sex scandal.Freeholds of its charity shops on the high street are set to be sold as part of a bid “to save substantial amounts of money to put [us] on a more stable and sustainable footing”, according to documents seen by The Guardian.The charity needs to make the savings because of shortfall in its “unrestricted” budget – money raised from its shops and individuals to be spent on whatever it sees fit – suggesting donors and shoppers stayed away after the scandal.The seven-page document, marked confidential and circulated by circulated last week by the chief executive of Oxfam GB, Mark Goldring, says: “It is clear … that the size of our programmes will be substantially reduced for this year and next … this means making tough choices.”The document said the charity would “sell freehold property to quickly raise substantial funds. This will be done mainly on a sale and lease back basis to preserve our ability to trade from these locations.” The document acknowledges that Oxfam has to win back confidence. “We know we need to better inspire and engage the UK public,” it said. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Queen and senior royals lead nations tributes to war dead as Britain

This has just come in from our correspondent, Joe Shute, who is at the Cenotaph this morning: It is not just lost soldiers but lost regiments being remembered at the Cenotaph. The Royal Northumberland Fusiliers raised 52 battalions during the First World War but in 1968 the regiment was amalgamated into the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers. A 40-strong contingent from the Royal Northumberland Fusiliers (All Ranks) Club is among those taking part in the march. Captain Christopher Christopher Dorman-O’Gowan, 72, is marching in honour of his father Major General Eric Edward Dorman-Smith, who served with the 1stBattalion, Northumberland Fusiliers during the Great War and in June 1915 was awarded the Military Cross. The Prince of Wales laying the wreath at the Cenotaph this morning The Labour leader has drawn some criticism online for his sartorial choices at the ceremony today.Mr Corbyn was wearing a casual jacket and red tie for the service, which was picked up on by some people on Twitter. Police officers detain a protester who tried to jump into the motorcade of U.S. President Donald Trump on his way to the commemoration ceremony at the Arc de TriompheCredit:Reuters Big Ben’s bells rung today as it remains encased in scaffoldingCredit:PA 9:54AMFrom our correspondent James Crisp who is at the Menin Gate in Ypres  A nation’s thank youFamilies whose ancestors died or were injured in the First World War will also be remembering their relatives as they take part in a “people’s procession”.A total of 10,000 people, chosen by ballot, will have the opportunity to pay their respects to all those who served in the First World War by taking part in the Nation’s Thank You procession past the Cenotaph. Here’s some moving quotes from some of those who survived the four year conflict The armistice, which was signed by German and Allied generals at 5am GMT, came into effect six hours later at 11am. Every year since then the country has paused at 11am for two minutes to remember the men and women who lost their lives in the conflict.The Palace announced this morning that the Duke of Edinburgh could not attend the service and a wreath was laid on his behalf by an equerry. Later this evening, the Queen, the Prince of Wales, the Duchess of Cornwall, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, and the Duke and Duchess of Sussex will attend a special service at Westminster Abbey, alongside Mr Steinmeier. The Queen and President Steinmeier at the Westminster Abbey serviceCredit:Paul Grover/Daily Telegraph/ PA This comes from our correspondent in Paris, David Chazan: Church bells tolled across France at 11 am local time to commemorate the signing of the Armistice at 11 am on November 11, 1918.The agreement ending the First World War was signed in train carriage in a forest clearing in Compiègne, north of Paris, by the First Sea Lord, Admiral Rosslyn Wemyss, Marshal Ferdinand Foch for France, and by four German representatives.Meanwhile in Paris, President Emmanuel Macron and the German chancellor Angela Merkel led world leaders who walked the last few yards up the Champs-Elysées to the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at the Arc de Triomphe. Donald Trump arrived separately in his armour-plated limousine, the Beast.French commentators remarked on the absence of a high-level British leader or member of the Royal Family. David Lidington, the minister for the Cabinet Office, is attending the ceremonies.   Volunteers working on Pages of the Sea this morning Credit:Reuters There is no war memorial in Butterton, but this ceramic poppy was put up in 2006 as a focal point to remember the wars. The Queen watching the service at the Cenotaph from the balcony of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office with the Duchesses of Cambridge and CornwallCredit:PA At 11, all the bells in Ypres rang out. November 11 is celebrated as a public holiday, liberation day, in Belgium. Regimental flags were dipped as the reveille was sounded under the Menin Gate. Ealier the bands had played Danny Boy and World in Union, later a Piper would sound a lament. The President of Germany has made history today appearing at the Cenotaph.Following the Prince of Wales who laid a wreath on behalf of the Queen, Frank Walter-Steinmeier laid a wreath at the foot of the Cenotaph and stood with his head bowed. The Queen and President of Germany heard prayers for a time of “harmony” during a service at Westminster Abbey marking the centenary of the Armistice.President Frank-Walter Steinmeier and the Queen were joined by the Prime Minister, the Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and the Duke and Duchess of Sussex for the remembrance service.Dean of Westminster, Dr John Hall, prayed for a time when conflict was “transformed into friendship and collaboration”.The Queen, dressed in purple, and Mr Steinmeier watched as flowers were laid at the grave of The Unknown Warrior, later shaking hands at the end of the service. Big Ben’s bongs today also heralded the start of church bells ringing out across the nation to mark the end of the First World War 100 years ago today. 1:25PM10,000 strong ‘People’s Procession’ past the Cenotaph The Butterton survivors of the First World War The faces of men and women who served in the First World War were etched into the sands of beaches across the nation.The tribute was organised by film director Danny Boyle and saw volunteers working through the night to create the beautiful and haunting images.Here’s our correspondent Guy Kelly’s dispatch from Folkestone in Kent, where the face of war poet Wilfred Owen gradually disappeared with the the Sunny Sands tide, in which you can read about all the other servicemen and women commemorated in the project. Joe Shute, our correspondent at the Cenotaph, says: Having laid their wreaths the Royal Family has now departed and the march past the Cenotaph is about to commence.Among the charities involved in the march are the Children and Families of Far East Prisoners of War.  The Duke of Edinburgh with the Queen at last year's Remembrance Sunday services President of Germany Frank-Walter Steinmeier lays a wreath during the remembrance service at the Cenotaph memorial 2:28PM’Thankful village’ remembers its 15 heroes who returned The nation came to a standstill to remember the millions who fell and died on the First World War, which can to an end 100 years ago today.At the Cenotaph the firing of the guns by the King’s Troop marked the end of the two minute’s silence before the Last Post was played. 1:47PM’Such a tremendous honour’ 11:07AMTwo minutes silence observed  American troops cheer after hearing the news that the Armistice had been signed, meanwhile hundreds of solider continued to die on that day The Lord’s prayer was read in Dutch and English before the exhortation preceding the minutes silence was read. “we will remember them,” answered the massed ranks at the Menin Gate before falling into silence. There is no war memorial in Butterton, but this ceramic poppy was put up in 2006 as a focal point to remember the wars. 10:53AMCeremony starts at the Cenotaph Long way to Tipperary as cadets, police, fire service and schoolchildren March through the Menin Gate. #ArmisticeDay100 #Ypres . Privilege to be here. pic.twitter.com/Xp9sgYRGIZ— James Crisp (@JamesCrisp6) November 11, 2018 He was unfortunately not well enough to attend the service but his nephew garage owner Tim Mollatt, 52,  was among the proud congregation and said: ‘He’d be really honoured to know we were thinking about him and all the survivors from the village of both wars.’ The Prince of Wales laying his wreath at the Cenotaph this morningCredit:AFP 10:58AMLost battalions remembered at the Cenotaph   Our correspondent James Crisp at the Menin Gate at Ypres, Belgium, captured the moment thousands of poppy petals were released as part of a poignant tribute at the site of one of the worst slaughters of the conflict. A newly discovered ‘thankful  village’ today remembered its 15 First World War heroes and paid thanks to the fact that each one survived and returned home 100 years ago.The tiny close-knit village of Butterton, nestled in the Staffordshire Moorlands, is one of the few British communities which can commemorate the welcoming back of all its brave warriors, Tracey Kandohla writes.Locals packed picturesque St Bartholomew’s Church for a special Remembrance Sunday service – where an aptly named Thankful Bell rung out in honour of villagers who served their country. It is estimated that nine million military personnel were killed between July 28 1914 and November 11 1918. 12:09PMVeterans showered with poppy petals at the Menin Gate Pam Gillespie, of Harlow in Essex, is marching with her two daughters and nine-year-old grandson, Thomas, (among the youngest taking part) in memory of her father George Money, who was captured in Java in 1942 and spent three-and-a-half years as a prisoner of war, and her great uncle Thomas Smith, a Lance Corporal in the Lancashire Fusiliers who was killed at Gallipoli in April 1915.“He was 25 when he died,” she says. “I’ve got a photograph of him and looking at it you just think of the waste of life.  It must have been horrendous for him. The enemy just picked them off as they landed.” The Duchess of Sussex watching the service at the Cenotaph from the balcony of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office Armistice Day: the final day of the First World War, as it happened on November 11, 1918 Daniel Hannan: Though the way we remember World War One constantly changes, we mourn all the sameEleven soldiers who lost their lives on Armistice DayHow the Great War changed our nation foreverFind the Great War heroes who share your nameCharles Moore: Why Remembrance matters so muchLast Post plays at Ypres as veterans mark 100 years since the end of the First World War The Prince of Wales has led the nation in remembering those who gave their lives in the First World War as he laid the wreath at the Cenotaph.For the first time ever he was joined the German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier, marking a historic act of reconciliation between the two nations.The Queen watched from the balcony of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office along with the Duchess of Cambridge and Duchess of Cornwall.Remembrance services have been taking place all over Britain and Europe, which is an hour ahead, to mark the Armistice that ended the hostilities 100 years ago.It is estimated that nine million military personnel were killed between July 28 1914 and November 11 1918. 11:49AMRoyal Family departs Cenotaph as march begins  Politicians around the worldThe French President, Emmanuel Macron, led the ceremony in Paris to mark the 100th anniversary of Armistice Day.Around 70 world leaders were in attendance, including Donald Trump, Vladimir Putin, Angela Merkel, Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Jean-Claude Juncker, for a ceremony at the Arc de Triomphe.Trump and his wife Melania arrived in the French capital yesterday, and were greeted at the Elysee Palace in Paris by the French President and his wife Brigitte. At midday today the air filled with the sound of tens of thousands of ringing of church bells across the country.The mass harmonious strains were the culmination of a year-long campaign, Ringing Remembers, that intended to commemorate the 1,400 bell ringers who died in First World War by recruiting the same number of new ringers.  Services have been taking place across the country to commemorate those who never returned from the battlefields of France and elsewhere.Among them was a service at Christchurch Cathedral, Oxford, to honour the 239 Christchurch soldiers who fought in the First World War, writes Coran Elliott.The proceedings were accompanied by Christchurch Cathedral Choir and led by The Reverend Canon Andrew Studdert- Kennedy.Oxford resident Denise Walker, 80, was chose to lay a wreath of remembrance at the memorial of Christchurch Cathedral today. The Duchess of Sussex watching the service at the Cenotaph from the balcony of the Foreign and Commonwealth OfficeCredit: James Whatling Photography The Butterton survivors of the First World War 12:49PMBig Ben’s bell rings for first time in almost a year Big Ben’s bell rung for the first time in almost a year to mark the start of the minute’s silence at 11am.The monument’s 15 ton-bell has remained silent since the scaffolding went up as part of its renovation works. Freer’s son, David, who is pushing his father’s wheelchair in the march, said: “When we go over to his grave in France we always leave him for a few moments to reflect and the tears come into his eyes. It is very emotional.”Freer, who is marching with the charity Blind Veterans UK, described being the oldest veteran to attend as a “huge honour”. Congregants at the service at Christ Church cathedral in Oxford  Queen Elizabeth II and German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier attend a National Service to mark the centenary of the Armistice at Westminster Abbey, London. To mark the First World War centenary occasion, and to commemorate the dead, the Telegraph has been granted access to the Commonwealth War Grave Commission’s database of graves.Here, you can search for a surname using our tool and find out information about the number of Commonwealth casualties who shared that name –  where they died, at what stage of the war and who their family were. The database itself is an incredible monument to the war dead and can offer fascinating (and sobering) insight into the identities of those who fought. A 94-year-old veteran attending the service at the Guildhall Square in Portsmouth today said it is ‘essential’ younger generations continue to remember the millions who died fighting in the two World Wars.Former sailor Frank Cole, served during World War Two and was part of the D-Day landings.Mr Cole, from East Molesey, Surrey, served on aircraft carrier HMS Audacity and has recently received a prestigious award from the French Embassy for his contribution in Normandy.He said: “I was in command operations in the Royal Navy between 1941 and 1945.”I served on the HMS Audacity in 1941, was part of the D-Day landings in 1944, and spent a year battling in Japan.”My father was seriously injured during World War One and was put in a tent with some other soldiers who weren’t expected to survive.”One of the doctors checking on everyone told him he was going to survive – against the odds.“Then in World War Two I was on one of the landing craft in Normandy, I recently was awarded the Legion d’Honneur by the French Embassy for my bravery on D-Day.”I think it’s really important that we continue to remember. It’s been 100 years since my father served and 70 years since I served.”But that doesn’t mean we should stop remembering and thinking about the millions who sacrificed themselves fighting for us.”It’s essential that the younger generations are taught about the wars so it never happens again, and so they can remember their family members.”I am honoured to be a part of the service today – it is always special when so many veterans are together in one place to remember our friends and family.” Led by community engagement organisation Big Ideas in partnership with the Central Council of Church Bell Ringers, the British government and the German government, the campaign’s ambition was grand – especially with only 12 months to achieve it – but as the Telegraph can exclusively reveal today, the response has far surpassed expectations. This week, there were more than 2,400 new campanologists learning to ring bells, and over 3,000 total signups. Jeremy Corbyn at the Cenotaph today Poppies are thrown from the Menin Gate to symbolise the fallen. #armistice100 #Ypres pic.twitter.com/P8NPCOjZKf— James Crisp (@JamesCrisp6) November 11, 2018 12:06PMA historic moment for Anglo-German reconciliation  Research by Ancestry found that Durham was the hardest hit town in the First World War in terms of the proportion of the population who died.After cross-referencing war dead records with Census data the research found that 6,353 men from Durham died in the war – 7.7 per cent of the population. Long way to Tipperary as cadets, police, fire service and schoolchildren March through the Menin Gate. #ArmisticeDay100 #Ypres . Privilege to be here. pic.twitter.com/Xp9sgYRGIZ— James Crisp (@JamesCrisp6) November 11, 2018 Did you know that 861 people are recorded as having died on Armistice Day itself? The youngest of these was Private William Leet of the Royal Air Force who died aged 17 and whose memorial can be found in Sidcup, Kent. The last soldier killed before the Armistice took effect was Henry Gunther, an American who died at 10:59am on 11 November 1918. Femen protesters staged a topless protest near President Trump’s motorcade. The feminist activists were dragged away by police as they tried to dash toward’s the president’s limousine. 9:24AMWorld leaders have started arriving at the Elysee Palace ahead of the Paris ceremony at the Arc de Triomphe Congregants at the service at Christ Church cathedral in Oxford Credit:Coran Elliott 10:36AMProtesters tackled trying to reach Donald Trump’s limousine in Paris Why on earth can’t Corbyn wear a black coat and black tie at the Cenotaph?— Jamie Merrill (@Jamie_Merrill) November 11, 2018 German Chancellor Angela Merkel being greeted by French President Emmanuel Macron and his wife Brigitte Macron as she arrived at the Elysee Palace in Paris this morning According to our correspondent on the ground in Paris, David Chazan, Trump has arrived now at the Arc de Triomphe, with Russian president President Vladimir Putin also arriving separately a few minutes later. The two leaders and their wives greet one another at the Elysee Palace on Saturday 10:47AMVeterans marching towards the Cenotaph The Prince of Wales laying the wreath at the Cenotaph this morningCredit:Max Mumby No war memorial has ever been erected so the focal point on the centenary of the Armistice was the church full to brimming with a 150-strong congregation.The village, with 250 inhabitants, is one of just 54 ‘thankful villages’ in England and Wales where no one who fought in the war passed away.It is also part of an even rarer group of 18 ‘doubly thankful’ villages which suffered no loses in both the First and Second World War. A further thirteen soldiers served against Hitler’s forces and all of them came back.One single survivor from the second conflict Eddie Mollatt, who served with the Royal Naval Coastal Forces, is still alive today, aged 94, and living locally. British troops in a captured German trench during the battle of the Somme 1916 The Prince of Wales has laid his wreath at the Cenotaph as the Queen watched with the Duchess of Cambridge and the Duchess of Cornwall from the balcony of the Foreign and Commonwealth office. 8:18PMThe Queen and Germany’s President attend Westminster Abbey service For almost 90 years, there were no bells ringing from St George’s Memorial Church in Ypres, reports James Crisp from Belgium.On the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War, they rang four times in memory of the fallen, with the help of Telegraph readers. The Armistice on 11 November 1918 caused the number of Great War deaths to plummet considerably, but as Britain marks the Armistice centenary it’s important to remember that casualties still continued after this date. A military band passes The Cenotaph during the annual Remembrance Sunday memorial on November 11, 2018 in London, England. A sand drawing on Ayr Beach of Second Lieutenant Walter Tull 10:01AMMinute’s silence being observed in Ypres where they are an hour ahead  From St Ninian’s on Shetland to Porthcurno in Cornwall, the 30ft long images – each with a connection to the local area – are being drawn at low tide by teams of six to 10 artists delicately wielding garden rakes. Once completed around three hours later, crowds will have just moments to absorb the haunting faces of the fallen gazing back at them before they are reclaimed by the advancing tides.In Folkestone, Kent, where Boyle is in attendance to witness a larger, 60ft likeness of war poet Wilfred Owen carved into Sunny Sands, volunteers from the artistic collective Sand In Your Eye have been working under torchlight to lay out the portrait with LED markers. A small crowd of all ages has defied sea squalls and driving rain to witness the drawing, which is anticipated to be finished at 10.30am. At that point, they will be invited to create their own sand portraits using stencils. In advance of the tides turning, they will then have a fleeting moment to reflect on the Glorious Dead. Veterans attending the service of remembrance at the CenotaphCredit:PA The two leaders and their wives greet one another at the Elysee Palace on SaturdayCredit:LUDOVIC MARIN/AFP/Getty Images The scene at the Cenotaph. The Armed Forces will shortly lead the nation in marking the centenary of the end of the First World War and in remembering all those who have made the ultimate sacrifice. #Armistice100 pic.twitter.com/xS73fIhwM8— Ministry of Defence 🇬🇧 (@DefenceHQ) November 11, 2018 1:57PM’I was oppressed with a sense of the awful responsibility of being spared’ In the afternoon, many of them will attend an International Peace Forum, but Donald Trump, no fan of international organisations, will not attend.The meeting at the Musee d’Orsay art museum on the banks of the Seine is intended to stress multilateralism and the importance of international alliances in resolving conflicts. Instead, Mr Trump will visit an American military cemetery in Suresnes, in western Paris, and is to hold a press conference before flying home.However, rain is forecast, which may prompt the US president to cancel the cemetery visit. Yesterday he cancelled a visit to another American cemetery 50 miles from Paris because of the weather. About 10,000 soldiers and police will guard the ceremonies.Anti-Trump protesters are planning to demonstrate in the afternoon at Place de la République in central Paris, about three miles east of the Arc de Triomphe. Police will maintain tight security at the protest, which the authorities fear could be hijacked by violent groups. Veterans attending the service of remembrance at the Cenotaph 6:07PMChurch bells built by Telegraph readers ring on Armistice Day for first time 9:10AMA dispatch from our correspondent Guy Kelly in Folkstone this morning For the first time ever the Prince was accompanied by the German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier, marking a historic act of reconciliation between the two nations, who also laid a wreath.Following the Prince wreath the nation’s political leaders also laid wreaths at the Cenotaph, led by Prime Minster Theresa May, and then Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn and leader of the Liberal Democrats Vince Cable. Jeremy Corbyn at the Cenotaph todayCredit:PA 10:43AMDanny Boy played at the Menin Gate ahead of the minute’s silence  President of Germany Frank-Walter Steinmeier lays a wreath during the remembrance service at the Cenotaph memorialCredit:PA 5:56PMNames and beaches of those commemorated in the sands of the Pages of the Sea project As part of event, two B-type buses which served as military vehicles between 1914 and 1918 – and are the last surviving models from the period – will be on The Mall. This will mark the contribution of bus drivers during the First World War and will be the first time they have appeared in an Armistice Day parade since the 1960s.As well as the parade, civilians across the country will ring church bells in unison across the country on Sunday; it is expected that 1,700 people will take part in the event. Church bells across the UK remained restricted throughout the course of the war and only rang freely once Armistice was declared on November 11, 1918.   Volunteers rake the sand as they draw depictions of those killed in WW1, part of Danny Boyle’s Pages of The Sea celebrations, on Sunny Sands Beach in FolkestoneCredit:Reuters 10:16AMBells are ringing across France American troops cheer after hearing the news that the Armistice had been signed, meanwhile hundreds of solider continued to die on that dayCredit:AP Veteran soldiers march across Horse Guards Parade before attending a National Service of Remembrance at The Centoph in Westminster, LondonCredit:Reuters 10:31AMThe Duke of Edinburgh is not expected to attend the Cenotaph The Queen watching the service at the Cenotaph from the balcony of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office with the Duchesses of Cambridge and Cornwall 11:16AMThe Prince of Wales lays a wreath at the Cenotaph Crowds have been building at Whitehall for several hours now. Fortunately weather has cleared up. One veteran tells me ‘it never rains on the Queen’s Parade #RemembranceDay2018 pic.twitter.com/CdpTsNpXev— Joe Shute (@JoeShute) November 11, 2018 Experienced bell ringer Louise Booth shows the ropes to new recruit Leanne Masterdon, whose grandfather served in WW1 A military band passes The Cenotaph during the annual Remembrance Sunday memorial on November 11, 2018 in London, England.Credit:Getty “Beaches are truly public spaces, where nobody rules other than the tide,” Boyle said in advance of the day. “They seem the perfect place to gather and say a final goodbye and thank you to those whose lives were taken or forever changed by the First World War.” An aerial drone has captured this spectacular image etched into the sand of Sunny Ayr Beach, in Scotland, as part of the ‘Pages of the Sea’ project being headed by film director Danny Boyle. It’s of Second Lieutenant Walter Tull, who was Britain’s second black professional footballer after signing up with Rangers, and the first black officer in the British Army.   12:15PM ‘It’s essential younger generations are taught about the wars so it never happens again’ The Duke of Edinburgh is not expected to attend the Cenotaph today having retired from official duties last year.According to Buckingham Palace he has missed the commemorations around half a dozen times in the past because of overseas tours or other royal duties: including 1956, 1964, 1968 and 1999. Derby, Dumfries, Lanark and Perth also made the top five in terms of hardest hit towns.At the opposite end of the scale there were some villages that lost nobody during the First World War.These so-called “Thankful villages” include Llanfihangel y Creuddyn near Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, and Herbrandston in Pembrokeshire, both of which lost nobody in either the first or second world wars. The Duke of Edinburgh with the Queen at last year’s Remembrance Sunday servicesCredit:Getty 10:25AMImage of UK’s first black officer on sands of Ayr Beach Some considered the choice was ‘disrespectful’ and suggested a black tie would have been more appropriate for the somber occasion. Theresa May paying her respects at the CenotaphCredit:PA A sand drawing on Ayr Beach of Second Lieutenant Walter TullCredit:SWNS Mrs Walker whose grandfather lost and eye and an arm in the war describes the task as an ‘honour’.She said: “This is such a tremendous honour, I feel grateful to those thousands of men who gave their lives.“My grandfather lost an arm and an eye just weeks before the end of the war and he suffered with many problems after the war ended.“So, I want to pray for the people who have suffered through war and for those whose suffering may be on going.’’ The traditional march past the Cenotaph will be followed by the 10,000 strong ‘People’s Procession’ honouring those who served in the First World War. Many of those marching have descendants who fought in the war.Friends Lesley Swan and Alison Thornton have travelled from Aberdeen to honour their relatives. Swan, a 53-year-old former nursery teacher, has two great uncles who were both awarded the Victoria Cross (the highest award for gallantry). During the Battle of the Somme in 1916 her great uncle Albert Hill and his company officer found themselves surrounded by 20 German soldiers in a woods. Albert killed 18 with two grenades, captured two, and went on to rescue two men from no man’s land. Tragically on the same day of his heroic actions elsewhere on the Somme his brother Joseph was killed. In June 1918 Hill’ls other brother, Enoch, was also killed. The other family VC was awarded to Swan’s great uncle John Beeley in the Second World War.“It makes me so proud and honoured,” she says. “It is so moving to be here.”Alison Thornton, 58, is marching with her grandfather’s campaign medals pinned to her chest. A lieutenant with the 18thBattalion Durham Light Infantry, Hedworth Williamson Tait was just 19 when he lost his leg on the first day of the Battle of the Somme. He was rescued three days later lying in a shell hole in No Man’s Land with a belt wrapped around his thigh as a tourniquet.Despite his injury he transferred to the Balloon Corps for the duration of the war and was awarded the French Croix  de Guerre and Distinguished Flying Cross. “He died when I was 12 and I don’t remember him ever speaking about it,” Thornton recalls. “If he was here today, I would firstly like to say a very emotional thank you. And then to ask, how did it feel the night before they went over the top?”  Dorman-O’Gowan grew up with his father’s stories and hoped to follow him into the Northumberland Fusiliers but as a result of the amalgamation served with the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers instead.“He never had any criticism of the war,” he recalls. “He just said it was the moment in time they were in: infantry coming up against machine guns. “Today I think of him, my regiment, the men of Northumberland who served with him, and of a whole generation who bled so we would not be dominated by Germany. I think of those who gave their lives for this nation and served.” Nearly 11. At the Menin Gate. Almost 60k names of the missing here. #armistice100 pic.twitter.com/x9TVjsNNzp— James Crisp (@JamesCrisp6) November 11, 2018 9:58AMRain has cleared ahead of the Cenotaph parade Theresa May paying her respects at the Cenotaph On a day that will see countless symbolic acts of public remembrance around the country, ‘Pages of the Sea’, a vast public art project curated by the Oscar-winning filmmaker Danny Boyle and commissioned by 14-18 Now, the UK art programme for the First World War centenary, sees 32 immense sand portraits depicting casualties from the conflict etched into the coastline of Britain and Ireland. Merkel will later give a speech at the Paris Peace Forum, which focuses on ‘concrete initiatives to strengthen multilateral cooperation’.Macron has spent the week visiting towns, cities and battlefield cites around northeast France to commemorate the anniversary. Earlier this week he hosted Theresa May in Thiepval; the site bears the names of more than 72,000 members of the Armed Forces who died in battle.In her second wreath-laying ceremony of the day, she and Mr Macron placed a garland combining poppies and cornflower le bleuet, the two national emblems of remembrance for Britain and France.On it she left a card with an extract from poem A Soldier’s Cemetery by Sergeant John William Streets which read: “There lie the flower of youth, the men who scorn’d to live (so died) when languished liberty.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. 1:56PMThe towns that lost most – and those that lost nobody He is the first German dignitary invited to the Cenotaph and was watched by his wife Elke Budenbender who accompanied the Duchess of Sussex on the Foreign Office balcony.The Queen was accompanied by the Duchess of Cornwall and Duchess of Cambridge although the Duke of Edinburgh was absent having retired from official duties last year. Crowds have been gathering around Whitehall since daybreak with a long queue stretching around Victoria Embankment to attend the commemorative service at the Cenotaph.Sean Wareing of Preston is one of those to bag an early spot on Whitehall by the statue of Field Marshal Earl Haigh,  commander-in-chief of the British Armies in France during the First World War. Veterans beginning to form for the march past accompanied by ripples of applause #RemembranceDay2018 pic.twitter.com/caP1xTtf8V— Joe Shute (@JoeShute) November 11, 2018 The Prince of Wales laying his wreath at the Cenotaph this morning British troops in a captured German trench during the battle of the Somme 1916Credit:BBC Pictures’ Digital Picture Big Ben's bells rung today as it remains encased in scaffolding The oldest veteran taking part in today’s march past the Cenotaph is 103-year-old Ron Freer. The former Royal Artillery Sergeant spent four years in a Japanese prisoner of war camp during the Second World War and suffered such severe malnutrition he was left blinded for life.Born in Teignmouth, Devon, he was three-years-old when his father William was killed at the Somme on September 4, 1918 and travels out every year to the Dernancourt Communal Cemetery in France to lay a poppy wreath at his grave. Veteran soldiers march across Horse Guards Parade before attending a National Service of Remembrance at The Centoph in Westminster, London Police officers detain a protester who tried to jump into the motorcade of U.S. President Donald Trump on his way to the commemoration ceremony at the Arc de Triomphe Mr Freer, 103, is set to march at the Cenotaph in London this Remembrance Sunday How can Jeremy Corbyn turn up to armistice day in a scruffy anorak?!— thank u, next (@jnoahmorgan) November 11, 2018 At that moment, bells erupted spontaneously across the country, as an outpouring of relief that four years of war had come to an end.Battle’s Over, a series of hundreds of local events to mark the centenary of the Armistice, will also take place on Sunday.Pipers will play, beacons will be lit and church bells will ring in all corners of the UK and around the world as communities pay tribute to the First World War fallen.Described as a nation’s tribute, Battle’s Over has been in the planning for four years and will see hundreds of locally-organised events mark the centenary.Pages of the SeaDirector Danny Boyle is asking people to gather on beaches across the UK on November 11 and etch silhouettes in the sand “remembering the millions of lives lost or changed forever by the conflict”.Events will take place at low tide at a number of beaches, including Perranporth in Cornwall, Clacton-on-Sea in Essex, and St Ninian’s beach in Shetland. More than 70 world leaders have started arriving at the Elysee Palace before going on to the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at the Arc de Triomphe, at the top of the grand avenue of the Champs-Elysees. Shuttle buses will ferry them between the presidential palace and the Arc de Triomphe, except for Donald Trump who will be driven there in his limousine, “the Beast”, for security reasons.President Macron will make a speech, which his aides say will emphasise parallels between 1918 and 2018. The leaders,  including Mr Trump, Angela Merkel and Vladimir Putin,  will then attend a luncheon at the Elysee Palace. In his bidding, the dean said: “Above all, in our remembrance and reflection, we hope for a time when aggression between peoples and nations is transformed into friendship and collaboration, when all may live side by side in mutual encouragement and harmony and the weapons of war are transformed into the instruments of peace.”In an address, the Archbishop of Canterbury said: “We look back at the ruins and find that they have been rebuilt.”We look forward, in a very different world and society, however great the challenges, and see that through the faithfulness of God and our loving obedience, conflict has been transformed, and enemies reconciled, and that is hope for the world.”The choir of Westminster Abbey sang throughout the service, and readings were delivered by Prince Charles, Theresa May, Sophie Okonedo and John Simm.Mr Steinmeier delivered his reading in German near to the end of the service. 9:27AMFind the Great War heroes who share your name The service has begun at the Cenotaph with Elgar’s Nimrod being played at the national memorial. The Prince of Wales is due to lead the nation’s tributes to all those who have lost their lives in conflict on the centenary of the Armistice today.He will lay a wreath at the Cenotaph on behalf of his mother for the second year in a row while an equerry will lay a wreath on behalf of the Duke of Edinburgh.The Queen will watch the Whitehall service from the balcony of the nearby Foreign and Commonwealth Office.For the first time, a German leader will lay a wreath at the Cenotaph, with President Frank-Walter Steinmeier performing the duty on behalf of his nation in an historic act of reconciliation between the two countries. Volunteers rake the sand as they draw depictions of those killed in WW1, part of Danny Boyle's Pages of The Sea celebrations, on Sunny Sands Beach in Folkestone German Chancellor Angela Merkel being greeted by French President Emmanuel Macron and his wife Brigitte Macron as she arrived at the Elysee Palace in Paris this morningCredit:AP 1:30PMRecord numbers of bell-ringers recruited for Armistice celebration  9:33AMCrowds are starting to gather at Whitehall ahead of the Cenotaph, according to our correspondent Joe Shute in London 11:42AMJeremy Corbyn attracting criticism for looking ‘scruffy’ at Cenotap 9:37AMHundreds of soldiers died on Armistice Day itself Experienced bell ringer Louise Booth shows the ropes to new recruit Leanne Masterdon, whose grandfather served in WW1Credit:Jeff Gilbert Wareing’s grandfather, Thomas, served with the Royal North Lancashire Regiment and was awarded the Military Medal for actions at Passchendaele, helping to arrest 18 Germans. He was wounded in the battle and spent a year recovering.  Volunteers working on Pages of the Sea this morning  Mr Freer, 103, is set to march at the Cenotaph in London this Remembrance SundayCredit:PA I know it’s petty but does @jeremycorbyn seriously think that a bright red tie and a scruffy hooded coat are appropriate wear for the Cenotaph? Or is he just trying to signal to his Leftie anti-war chums that he doesn’t really want to be there? Such poor judgement.— Julia Hartley-Brewer (@JuliaHB1) November 11, 2018 9:49AM 103-year-old Ron Freer will be the oldest veteran at the Cenotaph today read more

Instagram to ban all graphic selfharm images from platform

The Daily Telegraph has been campaigning for a statutory duty of care to protect children from online harms.Asked why it had taken Instagram so long to tackle self-harm and to act only after the publicity surrounding Molly’s death, Mr Mosseri said: “We have not been as focused as we should have been on the effects of graphic imagery of anyone looking at content.“That is something that we are looking to correct and correct quickly. It’s unfortunate it took the last few weeks for us to realise that. It’s now our responsibility to address that issue as quickly as we can.” The family of Molly Russell, who took her own life at 14, found she had been viewing material on Instagram linked to anxiety, Credit:PA The family of Molly Russell, who took her own life at 14, found she had been viewing material on Instagram linked to anxiety,  He said Instagram was also developing technology to blur remaining self-harm content and put it behind a privacy screen so people did not accidentally find it and view it. The company also plans to increase the help it provides for self-harmers who used Instagram to share their experience. Mosseri has met with Matt Hancock, the Health Secretary, who last week warned social media firms they could be banned if they failed to remove harmful material Earlier, the Instagram boss had met with Jeremy Wright, the Culture Secretary, who is due to publish in the next month his plans for new laws to regulate social media.It is expected to include plans for a regulator with powers to force social media companies to take down illegal material such as violence and child abuse within fixed time periods and to purge harmful but legal content such as cyberbullying and self-harm imagery. The move follows the death of Molly, 14, who took her life after viewing self-harm images. Her father, Ian, said Instagram “helped kill my daughter.”The announcement came as Mr Mosseri this afternoon met with Matt Hancock, the Health Secretary, who last week warned social media firms they could be banned if they failed to remove harmful material. Instagram is to ban all graphic self-harm images from its platform following the controversy over Molly Russell’s suicide which her father blamed on the site.In an exclusive interview with The Daily Telegraph, Adam Mosseri, head of Instagram, said “no graphic self-harm image” will in future be allowed on the platform.With his company having faced unprecedented criticism from ministers and charities over its failure to tackle self harm imagery, Mr Mosseri also disclosed Instagram would change its search mechanisms so that all self-harm related but non-graphic content would be harder for users to find.This would entail self-harm terms and content being removed from “Explore”, “Search”, hashtagged pages and account recommendations.“If there is self-harm related content that stays on the platform even if it’s admission orientated, maybe someone has a picture of a scar and says I am 30 days clean, it’s going to be much more difficult to find,” he told The Telegraph. Mosseri has met with Matt Hancock, the Health Secretary, who last week warned social media firms they could be banned if they failed to remove harmful materialCredit:Heathcliff O’Malley “It is encouraging to see that decisive steps are now being taken to try to protect children from disturbing content on Instagram and I hope that the company acts swiftly to implement these plans and make good on their commitments.“It is now time for other social media platforms to take action to recognise the responsibility they too have to their users if the internet is to become a safe place for young and vulnerable people.” He said the ban on graphic self harm would be introduced as “quickly and responsibly” as the company could.He pointed out that by allowing people to post content Instagram had helped save lives, by, for example, enabling friends to alert law enforcement agencies if someone was about to seriously harm themselves.“I do want to be careful because there is a tension between wanting to act and act quickly and need to act responsibly,” he told The Daily Telegraph.“For instance I don’t want to do anything that will unintentionally stigmatise any sort of mental health issues. I don’t want to do anything that will put a vulnerable person in a place where they feel unsupported or ashamed if we take that content down.“There is a tension between speed and responsibility. We are trying to figure out how to navigate that.”Following Instagram’s announcement, Ian Russell welcomed the company’s ban on graphic self-harm images and called for other social media companies to now act. He also urged Instagram to “act swiftly” to implement its new measures.Mr Russell said: “I welcome the commitment made today by Adam Mosseri to ban all graphic self-harm content from Instagram.“I also welcome their plans to change their search mechanisms in relation to self-harm and suicide related content and to increase the help and support it provides to its users. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Facebook takes down 130 pages linked to first fake news network uncovered

“Despite their misrepresentation of their identities, we found that these Pages, Groups and accounts were connected.“They frequently posted about local and political news including topics like immigration, free speech, racism, LGBT issues, far-right politics, issues between India and Pakistan, and religious beliefs including Islam and Christianity.”The company said it had notified police and the government over the network.Senior Conservative MP, Damian Collins, described the findings as “probably only the tip of the iceberg” when it comes to fake news in the UK.He added: “When Facebook looks for fake accounts spreading disinformation and other harmful content it finds them. The trouble is that it doesn’t look often enough.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Facebook has removed more than 130 pages linked to a UK-based ‘fake news’ network, in the first incident of its kind. The accounts, which had more than 180,000 followers across Facebook and Instagram, pumped out divisive pro- and anti-immigrant posts as well as material about atheism, Islam and the former English Defence League leader, Tommy Robinson.The Telegraph understands that the discovery was made after Facebook started investigating threatening posts about the Home Secretary, Sajid Javid.The incident is the first time Facebook has uncovered a coordinated UK-based misinformation network targeting a British audience.Although the accounts were disparate in their politics and messaging, Facebook said the people behind them were coordinating to “spread divisive comments on both sides of the political debate in the UK”.The pages had names such as Halal Speech, Anti Far Right Extremists and Atheists Research Centre. They tended to build up an audience around innocent sounding interests before switching to more politically-motivated content.A spokesman for Facebook said: “The individuals behind these accounts represented themselves as far-right and anti-far-right activists, frequently changed Page and Group names, and operated fake accounts to engage in hate speech and spread divisive comments on both sides of the political debate in the UK. read more

One million children taken on termtime holidays last year

One million children were taken on term-time holidays last year, with the number rising steeply following the Supreme Court ruling that made them illegal.Data on term-time absences, published by the Department for Education (DfE), reveal that last year had the highest number of “unauthorised” pupil absences on record.Figures released on Thursday appear to show that the publicity generated during the landmark legal case backfired, with more parents than ever taking advantage of cut-price fares during the school term.    A total of 1,047,480 pupils were taken on family holidays during term time in 2017-18, almost double the number from five years ago. Last year, 14.9 per cent of pupils in England missed one or more “sessions” – defined as half a day – of school on account of family holidays, up from 11.9 per cent three years previously.The surge coincided with a prolonged legal battle between the Isle of Wight council and Jon Platt, a local businessman who took his daughter on a trip to Disneyland Florida without her school’s permission in 2015.Mr Platt initially won a high-profile High Court case in May 2016, but the case was later referred to the Supreme Court, where he lost and judges concluded that even half a day’s absence was a breach of the law. DfE officials contacted a small sample of local authorities with large changes about the increase in 2017/18. “All six that responded cited that the Supreme Court judgment in this case had an effect on the number of penalty notices issued in 2017/18, either as a result of returning to pre-court case levels following a slowdown or from a change in behaviour as a result of the ruling,” the DfE said.Paul Whiteman, general secretary of the National Association of Headteachers, said that the fines system is “too blunt an instrument”, adding that “in many cases it drives a wedge between schools and families”.He said that the real problem is that the price of family holidays shoot up during school holidays but are much cheaper during term time.”[Parents] will both continue to be caught between a rock and hard place without some sensible Government intervention,” Mr Whiteman said. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Thousands of parents are thought to have booked cheaper holidays during term time following Mr Platt’s earlier victories Cllr Anntoinette Bramble, chair of the Local Government Association’s children and young people board, said that ensure good school attendance is of “paramount concern” for councils.“Parents and carers have a legal responsibility to make sure children attend school regularly while schools will monitor attendance and raise any concerns with councils,” she said.“If required, councils will support head teachers to take any action they feel necessary to address any issues with pupil attendance, including fining parents for unauthorised absences.”A DfE spokesman said that persistent absence from school is a “society-wide challenge” which “we all need to work together to resolve”.The spokesman added: “The rules on term-time absences are clear: no child should be taken out of school without good reason. We have put head teachers back in control by supporting them – and local authorities – to use their powers to deal with unauthorised absence.” Thousands of parents are thought to have booked cheaper holidays during term time following Mr Platt’s earlier victories Mr Platt was subsequently sent back to the Isle of Wight Magistrates, where he was fined £2,000 for failing to pay a £60 truanting fine.Thousands of parents are thought to have booked cheaper holidays during term time following Mr Platt’s earlier victories.The number of parents fined for their children’s poor attendance at school has risen by 74.7 per cent in the past year, figures also showed.  read more

Gap between private and state schools getting top A levels is at

The proportion of private school students achieving A* and A has decreased by 6.3 percentage points over the past decade, from 52 per cent to 45.7 per cent, according to data released by the Independent Schools Council (ISC). Meanwhile, the national proportion of students winning top grades over the same period has gone down by 1.5 percentage points, from 27 per cent in 2010 to 25.5 per cent this year.  The gap between private and state school pupils getting top A levels is at its narrowest in a decade, results reveal. The proportion of children educated in the independent sector winning the highest grades at A-levels is now at its lowest level since 2010, when the A* mark was introduced. Lord… read more

Trio remanded over 53 million robbery

Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedAk-47 trio remanded for unlicenced possession of guns, ammunitionJanuary 27, 2017In “Court”Trio accused of multiple counts of armed robbery remandedDecember 15, 2017In “Court”Trio implicated in multi-million-dollar robbery remandedJuly 5, 2017In “Court” A trio appeared before the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts on Monday morning and were all remanded to prison for reportedly executing a $5.3 million robbery.The men, 34-year-old Alvin Solomon of Timehri, East Bank Demerara (EBD), Asif Khan, 54 of 149 Bel West, West Bank Demerara (WBD) and 27-year-old Winston Raymond of Land of Canaan, East Bank Demerara (EBD), all denied the allegation read to them by City Magistrate, Judy Latchman.That charge alleged that they robbed Inshan Alli Bacchus of $5 million cash along with 49 rounds of ammunition, one computer bag and a cell phone; with a total value of $5.3 million on February 26 2018 at Alexander Street, Georgetown.Solomon was slapped with a second charge; that of being in possession of ammunition while not being licensed for same.The defendants were represented by Attorneys at Law Dexter Todd, Tiffany Jeffrey and Adrian Thompson.They made bail applications on the grounds that their clients were never placed in an Identification Parade.According to Todd, Solomon who is a Taxi Driver was stopped by Police ranks who arrested him and took him into Police custody in their vehicle. His vehicle was driven to the Police Station by a Police. He noted that his client’s vehicle was searched without him being present.However, Police Prosecutor, Arvin Moore told the Court that some $600,000 along with the stolen ammunition was discovered in Solomon’s car.The items were reportedly stolen form Bacchus when the trio broke into his vehicle which was parked.They were all remanded to prison and will return to Court on March 19 2018. read more